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Current challenges of research on filamentous fungi in relation to human welfare and a sustainable bio-economy: a white paper

Overview of attention for article published in Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Citations

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88 Dimensions

Readers on

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216 Mendeley
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Title
Current challenges of research on filamentous fungi in relation to human welfare and a sustainable bio-economy: a white paper
Published in
Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40694-016-0024-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vera Meyer, Mikael R. Andersen, Axel A. Brakhage, Gerhard H. Braus, Mark X. Caddick, Timothy C. Cairns, Ronald P. de Vries, Thomas Haarmann, Kim Hansen, Christiane Hertz-Fowler, Sven Krappmann, Uffe H. Mortensen, Miguel A. Peñalva, Arthur F. J. Ram, Ritchie M. Head

Abstract

The EUROFUNG network is a virtual centre of multidisciplinary expertise in the field of fungal biotechnology. The first academic-industry Think Tank was hosted by EUROFUNG to summarise the state of the art and future challenges in fungal biology and biotechnology in the coming decade. Currently, fungal cell factories are important for bulk manufacturing of organic acids, proteins, enzymes, secondary metabolites and active pharmaceutical ingredients in white and red biotechnology. In contrast, fungal pathogens of humans kill more people than malaria or tuberculosis. Fungi are significantly impacting on global food security, damaging global crop production, causing disease in domesticated animals, and spoiling an estimated 10 % of harvested crops. A number of challenges now need to be addressed to improve our strategies to control fungal pathogenicity and to optimise the use of fungi as sources for novel compounds and as cell factories for large scale manufacture of bio-based products. This white paper reports on the discussions of the Think Tank meeting and the suggestions made for moving fungal bio(techno)logy forward.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 216 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Cambodia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 210 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 25%
Student > Bachelor 35 16%
Researcher 32 15%
Student > Master 31 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 31 14%
Unknown 23 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 71 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 31%
Chemistry 11 5%
Engineering 9 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 4%
Other 21 10%
Unknown 29 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2020.
All research outputs
#620,015
of 15,671,821 outputs
Outputs from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#3
of 95 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,547
of 265,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,671,821 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 95 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,175 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them