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Benthic Nitrogen Loss in the Arabian Sea Off Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, January 2012
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Title
Benthic Nitrogen Loss in the Arabian Sea Off Pakistan
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, January 2012
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2012.00395
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Sokoll, Moritz Holtappels, Phyllis Lam, Gavin Collins, Michael Schlüter, Gaute Lavik, Marcel M. M. Kuypers

Abstract

A pronounced deficit of nitrogen (N) in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea suggests the occurrence of heavy N-loss that is commonly attributed to pelagic processes. However, the OMZ water is in direct contact with sediments on three sides of the basin. Contribution from benthic N-loss to the total N-loss in the Arabian Sea remains largely unassessed. In October 2007, we sampled the water column and surface sediments along a transect cross-cutting the Arabian Sea OMZ at the Pakistan continental margin, covering a range of station depths from 360 to 1430 m. Benthic denitrification and anammox rates were determined by using (15)N-stable isotope pairing experiments. Intact core incubations showed declining rates of total benthic N-loss with water depth from 0.55 to 0.18 mmol N m(-2) day(-1). While denitrification rates measured in slurry incubations decreased from 2.73 to 1.46 mmol N m(-2) day(-1) with water depth, anammox rates increased from 0.21 to 0.89 mmol N m(-2) day(-1). Hence, the contribution from anammox to total benthic N-loss increased from 7% at 360 m to 40% at 1430 m. This trend is further supported by the quantification of cd(1)-containing nitrite reductase (nirS), the biomarker functional gene encoding for cytochrome cd(1)-Nir of microorganisms involved in both N-loss processes. Anammox-like nirS genes within the sediments increased in proportion to total nirS gene copies with water depth. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of NirS revealed different communities of both denitrifying and anammox bacteria between shallow and deep stations. Together, rate measurement and nirS analyses showed that anammox, determined for the first time in the Arabian Sea sediments, is an important benthic N-loss process at the continental margin off Pakistan, especially in the sediments at deeper water depths. Extrapolation from the measured benthic N-loss to all shelf sediments within the basin suggests that benthic N-loss may be responsible for about half of the overall N-loss in the Arabian Sea.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 32%
Student > Master 7 16%
Researcher 6 14%
Other 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 32%
Environmental Science 10 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 16%
Chemistry 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2012.
All research outputs
#10,128,252
of 11,410,365 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#6,749
of 7,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#262,703
of 308,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#266
of 351 outputs
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