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Cow-baited tents are highly effective in sampling diverse Anopheles malaria vectors in Cambodia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Cow-baited tents are highly effective in sampling diverse Anopheles malaria vectors in Cambodia
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1488-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brandyce St. Laurent, Kolthida Oy, Becky Miller, Elizabeth B. Gasteiger, Eunjae Lee, Siv Sovannaroth, Robert W. Gwadz, Jennifer M. Anderson, Rick M. Fairhurst

Abstract

The accurate monitoring and evaluation of malaria vectors requires efficient sampling. The objective of this study was to compare methods for sampling outdoor-biting Anopheles mosquitoes in Cambodia. In the Cambodian provinces of Pursat, Preah Vihear, and Ratanakiri, six different mosquito trapping methods were evaluated: human landing collection (HLC), human-baited tent (HBT), cow-baited tent (CBT), CDC miniature light trap (LT), CDC miniature light trap baited with molasses and yeast (LT-M), and barrier fence (F) in a Latin square design during four or six consecutive nights at the height of the malaria transmission season. Using all traps, a total of 507, 1175, and 615 anophelines were collected in Pursat, Preah Vihear, and Ratanakiri, respectively. CBTs captured 10- to 20-fold more anophelines per night than the other five sampling methods. All 2297 Anopheles mosquitoes were morphologically identified and molecularly typed using standard morphological keys and sequencing the rDNA ITS2 region to distinguish cryptic species, respectively. Overall, an extremely diverse set of 27 known Anopheles species was sampled. CBTs captured the same molecular species that HLCs and the other four traps did, as well as additional species. Nine specimens representing five Anopheles species (Anopheles hyrcanus, Anopheles barbirostris sensu stricto, Anopheles barbirostris clade III, Anopheles nivipes, and Anopheles peditaeniatus) were infected with Plasmodium falciparum and were exclusively captured in CBTs. These data indicate that cow-baited tents are highly effective in sampling diverse Anopheles malaria vectors in Cambodia. This sampling method captured high numbers of anophelines with limited sampling effort and greatly reduced human exposure to mosquito bites compared to the gold-standard human landing collection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Master 4 10%
Unspecified 4 10%
Other 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 44%
Unspecified 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 13%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,520,128
of 8,348,788 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,496
of 2,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,659
of 252,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#64
of 128 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,348,788 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,933 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,101 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 128 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.