↓ Skip to main content

A paradigm shift in oxygen sensing with a twist in the tale!

Overview of attention for article published in Biochemical Journal, August 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
3 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A paradigm shift in oxygen sensing with a twist in the tale!
Published in
Biochemical Journal, August 2016
DOI 10.1042/bcj20160500
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ken D. O'Halloran

Abstract

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is pivotal to metabolic homoeostasis in eukaryotes, serving as a critical energy sensor. Increased AMPK activity during oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) protects against potentially catastrophic deficits in ATP supply. Although the nervous system circuitry for elaboration of the complex cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia has been understood in some detail for many decades, there is continued and considerable interest in the molecular machinery underpinning the mechanism(s) of oxygen sensing. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Evans et al. [(2016) Biochem. J.] review their recent work, which points to a pivotal role for AMPK in the transduction of cellular hypoxic stress to integrated ventilatory behaviour, critical in the defence of whole-body oxygen homoeostasis. Of great surprise, there is profound blunting of the hyperventilatory response to hypoxic stress in AMPK deficient mice, with resultant dysregulated breathing arising in spite of normal peripheral oxygen sensing and appropriate sensory input to the brain! Their pointedly provocative review challenges current dogma, and in doing so raises intriguing questions that probe fundamental aspects of our understanding of the mammalian ventilatory response to hypoxic stress. The engaging review by Evans et al. [(2016) Biochem. J.] is an interesting read that is sure to encourage colourful debate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 67%
Unknown 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 33%
Neuroscience 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,860,664
of 12,347,710 outputs
Outputs from Biochemical Journal
#10,262
of 10,973 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,781
of 264,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biochemical Journal
#85
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,347,710 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,973 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,306 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.