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Climate-associated population declines reverse recovery and threaten future of an iconic high-elevation plant

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Climate-associated population declines reverse recovery and threaten future of an iconic high-elevation plant
Published in
Global Change Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul D. Krushelnycky, Lloyd L. Loope, Thomas W. Giambelluca, Forest Starr, Kim Starr, Donald R. Drake, Andrew D. Taylor, Robert H. Robichaux

Abstract

Although climate change is predicted to place mountain-top and other narrowly endemic species at severe risk of extinction, the ecological processes involved in such extinctions are still poorly resolved. In addition, much of this biodiversity loss will likely go unobserved, and therefore largely unappreciated. The Haleakalā silversword is restricted to a single volcano summit in Hawai'i, but is a highly charismatic giant rosette plant that is viewed by 1-2 million visitors annually. We link detailed local climate data to a lengthy demographic record, and combine both with a population-wide assessment of recent plant mortality and recruitment, to show that after decades of strong recovery following successful management, this iconic species has entered a period of substantial climate-associated decline. Mortality has been highest at the lower end of the distributional range, where most silverswords occur, and the strong association of annual population growth rates with patterns of precipitation suggests an increasing frequency of lethal water stress. Local climate data confirm trends toward warmer and drier conditions on the mountain, and signify a bleak outlook for silverswords if these trends continue. The silversword example foreshadows trouble for diversity in other biological hotspots, and illustrates how even well-protected and relatively abundant species may succumb to climate-induced stresses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Germany 2 3%
Mexico 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Unknown 68 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 26%
Student > Master 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 38%
Environmental Science 27 35%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 9%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Unspecified 5 6%
Other 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2015.
All research outputs
#263,999
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#279
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,392
of 270,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#16
of 317 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,536 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 317 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.