↓ Skip to main content

Psychological interventions for adults who have sexually offended or are at risk of offending

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
95 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
355 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Psychological interventions for adults who have sexually offended or are at risk of offending
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2012
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd007507.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane A Dennis, Omer Khan, Michael Ferriter, Nick Huband, Melanie J Powney, Conor Duggan

Abstract

Sexual offending is a legal construct that overlaps, but is not entirely congruent with, clinical constructs of disorders of sexual preference. Sexual offending is both a social and a public health issue. Victim surveys illustrate high incidence and prevalence levels, and it is commonly accepted that there is considerable hidden sexual victimisation. There are significant levels of psychiatric morbidity in survivors of sexual offences.Psychological interventions are generally based on behavioural or psychodynamic theories.Behavioural interventions fall into two main groups: those based on traditional classical conditioning and/or operant learning theory and those based on cognitive behavioural approaches. Approaches may overlap. Interventions associated with traditional classical and operant learning theory are referred to as behaviour modification or behaviour therapy, and focus explicitly on changing behaviour by administering a stimulus and measuring its effect on overt behaviour. Within sex offender treatment, examples include aversion therapy, covert sensitisation or olfactory conditioning. Cognitive behavioural therapies are intended to change internal processes - thoughts, beliefs, emotions, physiological arousal - alongside changing overt behaviour, such as social skills or coping behaviours. They may involve establishing links between offenders' thoughts, feelings and actions about offending behaviour; correction of offenders' misperceptions, irrational beliefs and reasoning biases associated with their offending; teaching offenders to monitor their own thoughts, feelings and behaviours associated with offending; and promoting alternative ways of coping with deviant sexual thoughts and desires.Psychodynamic interventions share a common root in psychoanalytic theory. This posits that sexual offending arises through an imbalance of the three components of mind: the id, the ego and the superego, with sexual offenders having temperamental imbalance of a powerful id (increased sexual impulses and libido) and a weak superego (a low level of moral probation), which are also impacted by early environment.This updates a previous Cochrane review but is based on a new protocol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 355 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 349 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 60 17%
Researcher 55 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 15%
Student > Bachelor 46 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 8%
Other 57 16%
Unknown 56 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 110 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 79 22%
Social Sciences 36 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 2%
Other 29 8%
Unknown 64 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 91. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2019.
All research outputs
#229,271
of 15,526,154 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#491
of 11,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,504
of 259,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#26
of 491 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,526,154 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,209 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 491 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.