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IL28B Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism rs12979860 Is Associated With Spontaneous HIV Control in White Subjects

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Infectious Diseases, December 2012
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Title
IL28B Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism rs12979860 Is Associated With Spontaneous HIV Control in White Subjects
Published in
Journal of Infectious Diseases, December 2012
DOI 10.1093/infdis/jis717
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kawthar Machmach, Christina Abad-Molina, María C. Romero-Sánchez, María A. Abad, Sara Ferrando-Martínez, Miguel Genebat, Ildefonso Pulido, Pompeyo Viciana, María F. González-Escribano, Manuel Leal, Ezequiel Ruiz-Mateos

Abstract

The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs12979860 near the IL28B gene has been associated with the spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus. We sought to determine whether this SNP could be associated with the spontaneous control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We studied the prevalence of the IL28B CC genotype among 53 white HIV controllers, compared with the prevalence among 389 HIV-infected noncontrollers. We found that the IL28B CC genotype was independently associated with spontaneous HIV control (odds ratio [OR], 2.669; P = .017), as were female sex (OR, 7.077; P ≤ .001) and the presence of HLA-B57 and/or B27 (OR, 3.080; P = .017). This result supports the idea that common host mechanisms are involved in the spontaneous control of these 2 chronic infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
Denmark 1 3%
Unknown 30 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Unspecified 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Unspecified 4 12%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2012.
All research outputs
#9,622,670
of 12,027,003 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Infectious Diseases
#9,306
of 10,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#208,817
of 298,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Infectious Diseases
#92
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,027,003 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,275 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.