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Linking dopamine neurotransmission and neurogenesis: the evolutionary history of the NTAD (NCAM1-TTC12-ANKK1-DRD2) gene cluster

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics and Molecular Biology, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 video uploader

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Linking dopamine neurotransmission and neurogenesis: the evolutionary history of the NTAD (NCAM1-TTC12-ANKK1-DRD2) gene cluster
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, January 2012
DOI 10.1590/s1415-47572012000600004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nina Roth Mota, Eli Vieira Araujo-Jnr, Vanessa Rodrigues Paixão-Côrtes, Maria Cátira Bortolini, Claiton Henrique Dotto Bau

Abstract

Genetic studies have long suggested the important role of the DRD2 gene in psychiatric disorders and behavior. Further research has shown a conjoined effect of genes in the Chr11q22-23 region, which includes the NCAM1, TTC12, ANKK1 and DRD2 genes, or NTAD cluster. Despite a growing need to unravel the role of this cluster, few studies have taken into account interspecies and evolutionary approaches. This study shows that behaviorally relevant SNPs from the NTAD cluster, such as rs1800497 (Taq1A) and rs6277, are ancient polymorphisms that date back to the common ancestor between modern humans and Neanderthals/Denisovans. Conserved synteny and neighborhood indicate the NTAD cluster seems to have been established at least 400 million years ago, when the first Sarcopterygians emerged. The NTAD genes are apparently co-regulated and this could be attributed to adaptive functional properties, including those that emerged when the central nervous system became more complex. Finally, our findings indicate that NTAD genes, which are related to neurogenesis and dopaminergic neurotransmission, should be approached as a unit in behavioral and psychiatric genetic studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 48 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 24%
Student > Master 10 20%
Professor 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 27%
Neuroscience 5 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2015.
All research outputs
#8,276,361
of 14,635,989 outputs
Outputs from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#116
of 286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,486
of 254,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#6
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,635,989 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 286 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,152 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.