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Cnidarian phylogenetic relationships as revealed by mitogenomics

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Ecology and Evolution, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 X users
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
194 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
365 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Cnidarian phylogenetic relationships as revealed by mitogenomics
Published in
BMC Ecology and Evolution, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ehsan Kayal, Béatrice Roure, Hervé Philippe, Allen G Collins, Dennis V Lavrov

Abstract

Cnidaria (corals, sea anemones, hydroids, jellyfish) is a phylum of relatively simple aquatic animals characterized by the presence of the cnidocyst: a cell containing a giant capsular organelle with an eversible tubule (cnida). Species within Cnidaria have life cycles that involve one or both of the two distinct body forms, a typically benthic polyp, which may or may not be colonial, and a typically pelagic mostly solitary medusa. The currently accepted taxonomic scheme subdivides Cnidaria into two main assemblages: Anthozoa (Hexacorallia + Octocorallia) - cnidarians with a reproductive polyp and the absence of a medusa stage - and Medusozoa (Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Staurozoa) - cnidarians that usually possess a reproductive medusa stage. Hypothesized relationships among these taxa greatly impact interpretations of cnidarian character evolution.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 365 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
Germany 5 1%
Brazil 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 334 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 22%
Researcher 71 19%
Student > Bachelor 55 15%
Student > Master 53 15%
Other 14 4%
Other 47 13%
Unknown 45 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 192 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 58 16%
Environmental Science 30 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 <1%
Other 12 3%
Unknown 56 15%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2024.
All research outputs
#2,017,552
of 25,371,288 outputs
Outputs from BMC Ecology and Evolution
#493
of 3,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,732
of 290,305 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Ecology and Evolution
#9
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,371,288 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,305 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.