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An assessment of survey measures used across key epidemiologic studies of United States Gulf War I Era Veterans

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, January 2013
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2 tweeters

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6 Dimensions

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Title
An assessment of survey measures used across key epidemiologic studies of United States Gulf War I Era Veterans
Published in
Environmental Health, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-069x-12-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca B McNeil, Catherine M Thomas, Steven S Coughlin, Elizabeth Hauser, Grant D Huang, Karen M Goldstein, Marcus R Johnson, Tyra Dunn-Thomas, Dawn T Provenzale

Abstract

Over the past two decades, 12 large epidemiologic studies and 2 registries have focused on U.S. veterans of the 1990-1991 Gulf War Era. We conducted a review of these studies' research tools to identify existing gaps and overlaps of efforts to date, and to advance development of the next generation of Gulf War Era survey tools. Overall, we found that many of the studies used similar instruments. Questions regarding exposures were more similar across studies than other domains, while neurocognitive and psychological tools were the most variable. Many studies focused on self-reported survey results, with a range of validation practices. However, physical exams, biomedical assessments, and specimen storage were not common. This review suggests that while research may be able to pool data from past surveys, future surveys need to consider how their design can yield data comparable with previous surveys. Additionally, data that incorporate recent technologies in specimen and genetic analyses would greatly enhance such survey data. When combined with existing data on deployment-related exposures and post-deployment health conditions, longitudinal follow-up of existing studies within this collaborative framework could represent an important step toward improving the health of veterans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 16%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 11 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Psychology 7 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 14 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2013.
All research outputs
#13,710,680
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#1,079
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,040
of 285,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#64
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,568,640 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.0. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.