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Ethno-entomological observations from North Korea (officially known as the “Democratic People’s Republic of Korea”)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, January 2013
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Ethno-entomological observations from North Korea (officially known as the “Democratic People’s Republic of Korea”)
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-9-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

V Benno Meyer-Rochow

Abstract

In terms of scientific activities generally and ethnobiological pursuits in particular, North Korea, officially known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is an almost blank entity on the quilt of global research. During a sabbatical semester at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology the author used this opportunity to gather some information on the uses of insect and other terrestrial arthropods as human food and components of traditional healing methods in that country. Despite the widely publicised shortcomings in the supply of food stuffs to the population of North Korea, insects are not generally seen as a source of food worthy of exploitation. However, the therapeutic use of insects, centipedes and scorpions to treat illnesses as diverse as the common cold, skin rashes, constipation, dysentery, nervous prostration, whooping cough, osteomyelitis, tetanus, and various forms of cancer is apparently still popular. The arthropods used therapeutically are credited with anti-inflammatory, immunological and other health-promoting effects, because they are said to contain hormones, steroids, lipids and plant-derived alkaloids, all of which capable of exerting their effects on the human body.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 11 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2015.
All research outputs
#4,183,099
of 20,957,071 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#148
of 703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,463
of 278,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,957,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them