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The influence of personality and ability on undergraduate teamwork and team performance

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, January 2013
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
The influence of personality and ability on undergraduate teamwork and team performance
Published in
SpringerPlus, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/2193-1801-2-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jinny Rhee, David Parent, Anuradha Basu

Abstract

The ability to work effectively on a team is highly valued by employers, and collaboration among students can lead to intrinsic motivation, increased persistence, and greater transferability of skills. Moreover, innovation often arises from multidisciplinary teamwork. The influence of personality and ability on undergraduate teamwork and performance is not comprehensively understood. An investigation was undertaken to explore correlations between team outcomes, personality measures and ability in an undergraduate population. Team outcomes included various self-, peer- and instructor ratings of skills, performance, and experience. Personality measures and ability involved the Five-Factor Model personality traits and GPA. Personality, GPA, and teamwork survey data, as well as instructor evaluations were collected from upper division team project courses in engineering, business, political science, and industrial design at a large public university. Characteristics of a multidisciplinary student team project were briefly examined. Personality, in terms of extraversion scores, was positively correlated with instructors' assessment of team performance in terms of oral and written presentation scores, which is consistent with prior research. Other correlations to instructor-, students' self- and peer-ratings were revealed and merit further study. The findings in this study can be used to understand important influences on successful teamwork, teamwork instruction and intervention and to understand the design of effective curricula in this area moving forward. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2193-1801-2-16) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Turkey 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 85 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 23%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Student > Master 14 16%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 6 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 14 16%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 10%
Psychology 9 10%
Computer Science 8 9%
Other 30 33%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2013.
All research outputs
#2,904,312
of 3,620,975 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#544
of 742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,727
of 280,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#84
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,620,975 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 742 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,529 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.