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Life history of the stem tetrapod Acanthostega revealed by synchrotron microtomography

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
30 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
73 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Life history of the stem tetrapod Acanthostega revealed by synchrotron microtomography
Published in
Nature, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature19354
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Sanchez, Paul Tafforeau, Jennifer A. Clack, Per E. Ahlberg

Abstract

The transition from fish to tetrapod was arguably the most radical series of adaptive shifts in vertebrate evolutionary history. Data are accumulating rapidly for most aspects of these events, but the life histories of the earliest tetrapods remain completely unknown, leaving a major gap in our understanding of these organisms as living animals. Symptomatic of this problem is the unspoken assumption that the largest known Devonian tetrapod fossils represent adult individuals. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, life history data for a Devonian tetrapod, from the Acanthostega mass-death deposit of Stensiö Bjerg, East Greenland. Using propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRμCT) to visualize the histology of humeri (upper arm bones) and infer their growth histories, we show that even the largest individuals from this deposit are juveniles. A long early juvenile stage with unossified limb bones, during which individuals grew to almost final size, was followed by a slow-growing late juvenile stage with ossified limbs that lasted for at least six years in some individuals. The late onset of limb ossification suggests that the juveniles were exclusively aquatic, and the predominance of juveniles in the sample suggests segregated distributions of juveniles and adults at least at certain times. The absolute size at which limb ossification began differs greatly between individuals, suggesting the possibility of sexual dimorphism, adaptive strategies or competition-related size variation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 73 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Master 7 12%
Professor 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 39%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 285. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#44,574
of 14,007,897 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#4,815
of 71,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,919
of 264,024 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#187
of 998 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,007,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 71,087 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 78.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,024 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 998 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.