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RNA polymerase II depletion promotes transcription of alternative mRNA species

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Molecular Biology, August 2016
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1 tweeter

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Title
RNA polymerase II depletion promotes transcription of alternative mRNA species
Published in
BMC Molecular Biology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12867-016-0074-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lijian Yu, Mayuri Rege, Craig L. Peterson, Michael R. Volkert

Abstract

Cells respond to numerous internal and external stresses, such as heat, cold, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and osmotic pressure changes. In most cases, the primary response to stress is transcriptional induction of genes that assist the cells in tolerating the stress and facilitate the repair of the cellular damage. However, when the transcription machinery itself is stressed, responding by such standard mechanisms may not be possible. In this study, we demonstrate that depletion or inactivation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) changes the preferred polyadenylation site usage for several transcripts, and leads to increased transcription of a specific subset of genes. Surprisingly, depletion of RNA polymerase I (RNAPI) also promotes altered polyadenylation site usage, while depletion of RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) does not appear to have an impact. Our results demonstrate that stressing the transcription machinery by depleting either RNAPI or RNAPII leads to a novel transcriptional response that results in induction of specific mRNAs and altered polyadenylation of many of the induced transcripts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 35%
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 29%
Unspecified 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,335,924
of 8,348,788 outputs
Outputs from BMC Molecular Biology
#125
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,556
of 252,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Molecular Biology
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,348,788 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.