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Catastrophic Declines in Wilderness Areas Undermine Global Environment Targets

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 9,924)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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440 Mendeley
Title
Catastrophic Declines in Wilderness Areas Undermine Global Environment Targets
Published in
Current Biology, November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2016.08.049
Pubmed ID
Authors

James E.M. Watson, Danielle F. Shanahan, Moreno Di Marco, James Allan, William F. Laurance, Eric W. Sanderson, Brendan Mackey, Oscar Venter

Abstract

Humans have altered terrestrial ecosystems for millennia [1], yet wilderness areas still remain as vital refugia where natural ecological and evolutionary processes operate with minimal human disturbance [2-4], underpinning key regional- and planetary-scale functions [5, 6]. Despite the myriad values of wilderness areas-as critical strongholds for endangered biodiversity [7], for carbon storage and sequestration [8], for buffering and regulating local climates [9], and for supporting many of the world's most politically and economically marginalized communities [10]-they are almost entirely ignored in multilateral environmental agreements. This is because they are assumed to be relatively free from threatening processes and therefore are not a priority for conservation efforts [11, 12]. Here we challenge this assertion using new comparable maps of global wilderness following methods established in the original "last of the wild" analysis [13] to examine the change in extent since the early 1990s. We demonstrate alarming losses comprising one-tenth (3.3 million km(2)) of global wilderness areas over the last two decades, particularly in the Amazon (30%) and central Africa (14%). We assess increases in the protection of wilderness over the same time frame and show that these efforts are failing to keep pace with the rate of wilderness loss, which is nearly double the rate of protection. Our findings underscore an immediate need for international policies to recognize the vital values of wilderness and the unprecedented threats they face and to underscore urgent large-scale, multifaceted actions needed to maintain them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 643 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 440 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Colombia 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 411 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 23%
Researcher 97 22%
Student > Master 59 13%
Unspecified 40 9%
Student > Bachelor 36 8%
Other 105 24%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 161 37%
Environmental Science 161 37%
Unspecified 69 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 3%
Engineering 8 2%
Other 29 7%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2122. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2019.
All research outputs
#674
of 13,385,841 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#8
of 9,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27
of 263,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 214 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,385,841 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,924 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,373 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 214 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.