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Electromyographic fatigue of orbicular oris muscles during exercises in mouth and nasal breathing children

Overview of attention for article published in CoDAS, February 2015
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Title
Electromyographic fatigue of orbicular oris muscles during exercises in mouth and nasal breathing children
Published in
CoDAS, February 2015
DOI 10.1590/2317-1782/20152014078
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angela Ruviaro Busanello-Stella, Ana Paula Blanco-Dutra, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues Corrêa, Ana Maria Toniolo da Silva

Abstract

To investigate the process of fatigue in orbicularis oris muscles by analyzing the median frequency of electromyographic signal and the referred fatigue time, according to the breathing mode and the facial pattern. The participants were 70 children, aged 6 to 12 years, who matched the established criteria. To be classified as 36 nasal-breathing and 34 mouth-breathing children, they underwent speech-language, otorhinolaryngologic, and cephalometric evaluation. For the electromyographic assessment, the children had to sustain lip dumbbells weighing 40, 60, and 100 g and a lip exerciser, until the feeling of fatigue. Median frequency was analyzed in 5, 10, 15, and 20 seconds of activity. The referred time of the feeling of fatigue was also recorded. Data were analyzed through the analysis of variance - repeated measures (post hoc Tukey's test), Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U-test. A significant decrease in the median frequency from 5 seconds of activity was observed, independently from the comparison between the groups. On comparison, the muscles did not show significant decrease. The reported time for the feeling of fatigue was shorter for mouth-breathing individuals. This feeling occurred after the significant decrease in the median frequency. There were signals that indicated myoelectric fatigue for the orbicularis oris muscles, in both groups analyzed, from the first 5 seconds of activity. Myoelectric fatigue in the orbicularis oris muscles preceded the reported feeling of fatigue in all groups. The account for fatigue time was influenced by only the breathing pattern, occurring more precociously in mouth-breathing children.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Professor 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2016.
All research outputs
#6,420,450
of 8,461,697 outputs
Outputs from CoDAS
#58
of 105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,399
of 253,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CoDAS
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,461,697 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 105 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.2. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.