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Commonalities and differences in the implementation of models of care for arthritis: key informant interviews from Canada

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Commonalities and differences in the implementation of models of care for arthritis: key informant interviews from Canada
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1634-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheryl A. Cott, Aileen M. Davis, Elizabeth M. Badley, Rosalind Wong, Mayilee Canizares, Linda C. Li, Allyson Jones, Sydney Brooks, Vandana Ahlwalia, Gillian Hawker, Susan Jaglal, Michel Landry, Crystal MacKay, Dianne Mosher

Abstract

Timely access to effective treatments for arthritis is a priority at national, provincial and regional levels in Canada due to population aging coupled with limited health human resources. Models of care for arthritis are being implemented across the country but mainly in local contexts, not from an evidence-informed policy or framework. The purpose of this study is to examine existing models of care for arthritis in Canada at the local level in order to identify commonalities and differences in their implementation that could point to important considerations for health policy and service delivery. Semi-structured key informant interviews were conducted with 70 program managers and/or care providers in three Canadian provinces identified through purposive and snowball sampling followed by more detailed examination of 6 models of care (two per province). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically using a qualitative descriptive approach. Two broad models of care were identified for Total Joint Replacement and Inflammatory Arthritis. Commonalities included lack of complete and appropriate referrals from primary care physicians and lack of health human resources to meet local demands. Strategies included standardized referrals and centralized intake and triage using non-specialist health care professionals. Differences included the nature of the care and follow-up, the role of the specialist, and location of service delivery. Current models of care are mainly focused on Total Joint Replacement and Inflammatory Arthritis. Given the increasing prevalence of arthritis and that published data report only a small proportion of current service delivery is specialist care; provision of timely, appropriate care requires development, implementation and evaluation of models of care across the continuum of care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 2 7%
Professor 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 17%
Social Sciences 5 17%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,526,094
of 8,844,801 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,101
of 3,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,727
of 255,658 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#146
of 209 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,844,801 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,264 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,658 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 209 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.