↓ Skip to main content

The genome of the largest bony fish, ocean sunfish (Mola mola), provides insights into its fast growth rate

Overview of attention for article published in Giga Science, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 752)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
35 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The genome of the largest bony fish, ocean sunfish (Mola mola), provides insights into its fast growth rate
Published in
Giga Science, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13742-016-0144-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hailin Pan, Hao Yu, Vydianathan Ravi, Cai Li, Alison P. Lee, Michelle M. Lian, Boon-Hui Tay, Sydney Brenner, Jian Wang, Huanming Yang, Guojie Zhang, Byrappa Venkatesh

Abstract

The ocean sunfish (Mola mola), which can grow up to a length of 2.7 m and weigh 2.3 tons, is the world's largest bony fish. It has an extremely fast growth rate and its endoskeleton is mainly composed of cartilage. Another unique feature of the sunfish is its lack of a caudal fin, which is replaced by a broad and stiff lobe that results in the characteristic truncated appearance of the fish. To gain insights into the genomic basis of these phenotypic traits, we sequenced the sunfish genome and performed a comparative analysis with other teleost genomes. Several sunfish genes involved in the growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1) axis signalling pathway were found to be under positive selection or accelerated evolution, which might explain its fast growth rate and large body size. A number of genes associated with the extracellular matrix, some of which are involved in the regulation of bone and cartilage development, have also undergone positive selection or accelerated evolution. A comparison of the sunfish genome with that of the pufferfish (fugu), which has a caudal fin, revealed that the sunfish contains more homeobox (Hox) genes although both genomes contain seven Hox clusters. Thus, caudal fin loss in sunfish is not associated with the loss of a specific Hox gene. Our analyses provide insights into the molecular basis of the fast growth rate and large size of the ocean sunfish. The high-quality genome assembly generated in this study should facilitate further studies of this 'natural mutant'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Researcher 13 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 24%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 169. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2020.
All research outputs
#110,738
of 15,660,877 outputs
Outputs from Giga Science
#10
of 752 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,629
of 266,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Giga Science
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,660,877 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 752 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them