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Statin withdrawal in people with dementia

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
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Title
Statin withdrawal in people with dementia
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, September 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd012050.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernadette McGuinness, Chris R Cardwell, Peter Passmore

Abstract

There are approximately 24 million people worldwide with dementia; this is likely to increase to 81 million by 2040. Dementia is a progressive condition, and usually leads to death eight to ten years after first symptoms. End-of-life care should emphasise treatments that optimise quality of life and physicians should minimise unnecessary or non-beneficial interventions. Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors; they have become the cornerstone of pharmacotherapy for the management of hypercholesterolaemia but their ability to provide benefit is unclear in the last weeks or months of life. Withdrawal of statins may improve quality of life in people with advanced dementia, as they will not be subjected to unnecessary polypharmacy or side effects. However, they may help to prevent further vascular events in people of advanced age who are at high risk of such events. To evaluate the effects of withdrawal or continuation of statins in people with dementia on: cognitive outcomes, adverse events, behavioural and functional outcomes, mortality, quality of life, vascular morbidity, and healthcare costs. We searched ALOIS (medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois/), the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialised Register on 11 February 2016. We also ran additional searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Clinical. gov and the WHO Portal/ICTRP on 11 February 2016, to ensure that the searches were as comprehensive and as up-to-date as possible. We included all randomised, controlled clinical trials with either a placebo or 'no treatment' control group. We applied no language restrictions. Two review authors independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, using standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We found no studies suitable for inclusion therefore analysed no data. The search strategy identified 28 unique references, all of which were excluded. We found no evidence to enable us to make an informed decision about statin withdrawal in dementia. Randomised controlled studies need to be conducted to assess cognitive and other effects of statins in participants with dementia, especially when the disease is advanced.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 96 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 22%
Student > Bachelor 15 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Researcher 8 8%
Student > Postgraduate 7 7%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 17 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 12%
Psychology 9 9%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 21 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,150,969
of 15,467,277 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#3,163
of 11,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,336
of 266,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#65
of 181 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,467,277 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,315 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.