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The genomic signature of dog domestication reveals adaptation to a starch-rich diet

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

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mendeley
770 Mendeley
citeulike
11 CiteULike
Title
The genomic signature of dog domestication reveals adaptation to a starch-rich diet
Published in
Nature, January 2013
DOI 10.1038/nature11837
Pubmed ID
URN
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198620
Authors

Erik Axelsson, Abhirami Ratnakumar, Maja-Louise Arendt, Khurram Maqbool, Matthew T. Webster, Michele Perloski, Olof Liberg, Jon M. Arnemo, Åke Hedhammar, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Matthew T Webster, Jon M Arnemo, Ake Hedhammar, Åke Hedhammar, Axelsson, Erik, Ratnakumar, Abhirami, Arendt, Maja Louise, Maqbool, Khurram, Webster, Matthew T., Perloski, Michele, Liberg, Olof, Arnemo, Jon M., Hedhammar, Ake, Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

Abstract

The domestication of dogs was an important episode in the development of human civilization. The precise timing and location of this event is debated and little is known about the genetic changes that accompanied the transformation of ancient wolves into domestic dogs. Here we conduct whole-genome resequencing of dogs and wolves to identify 3.8 million genetic variants used to identify 36 genomic regions that probably represent targets for selection during dog domestication. Nineteen of these regions contain genes important in brain function, eight of which belong to nervous system development pathways and potentially underlie behavioural changes central to dog domestication. Ten genes with key roles in starch digestion and fat metabolism also show signals of selection. We identify candidate mutations in key genes and provide functional support for an increased starch digestion in dogs relative to wolves. Our results indicate that novel adaptations allowing the early ancestors of modern dogs to thrive on a diet rich in starch, relative to the carnivorous diet of wolves, constituted a crucial step in the early domestication of dogs.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 770 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 32 4%
Germany 7 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Portugal 6 <1%
Brazil 5 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Austria 4 <1%
Denmark 3 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Other 36 5%
Unknown 664 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 202 26%
Researcher 165 21%
Student > Bachelor 102 13%
Student > Master 91 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 67 9%
Other 143 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 549 71%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 48 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 46 6%
Environmental Science 26 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 25 3%
Other 76 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 710. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2017.
All research outputs
#3,454
of 7,927,343 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#746
of 46,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75
of 298,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#16
of 987 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,927,343 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46,754 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 987 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.