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Enabling Science Support for Better Decision-Making when Responding to Chemical Spills

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Enabling Science Support for Better Decision-Making when Responding to Chemical Spills
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, September 2016
DOI 10.2134/jeq2016.03.0090
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer L. Weidhaas, Andrea M. Dietrich, Nathan J. DeYonker, R. Ryan Dupont, William T. Foreman, Daniel Gallagher, Jennifer E.G. Gallagher, Andrew J. Whelton, William A. Alexander

Abstract

Chemical spills and accidents contaminate the environment and disrupt societies and economies around the globe. In the United States there were approximately 172,000 chemical spills that affected US waterbodies from 2004 to 2014. More than 8000 of these spills involved non-petroleum-related chemicals. Traditional emergency responses or incident command structures (ICSs) that respond to chemical spills require coordinated efforts by predominantly government personnel from multiple disciplines, including disaster management, public health, and environmental protection. However, the requirements of emergency response teams for science support might not be met within the traditional ICS. We describe the US ICS as an example of emergency-response approaches to chemical spills and provide examples in which external scientific support from research personnel benefitted the ICS emergency response, focusing primarily on nonpetroleum chemical spills. We then propose immediate, near-term, and long-term activities to support the response to chemical spills, focusing on nonpetroleum chemical spills. Further, we call for science support for spill prevention and near-term spill-incident response and identify longer-term research needs. The development of a formal mechanism for external science support of ICS from governmental and nongovernmental scientists would benefit rapid responders, advance incident- and crisis-response science, and aid society in coping with and recovering from chemical spills.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 6 26%
Environmental Science 2 9%
Social Sciences 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2017.
All research outputs
#693,908
of 9,140,924 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#59
of 1,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,845
of 257,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,140,924 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,359 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.