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Reduced middle ear infection with non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae, but not Streptococcus pneumoniae, after transition to 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Reduced middle ear infection with non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae, but not Streptococcus pneumoniae, after transition to 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12887-015-0483-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda Jane Leach, Christine Wigger, Kim Hare, Vanya Hampton, Jemima Beissbarth, Ross Andrews, Mark Chatfield, Heidi Smith-Vaughan, Peter Stanley Morris

Abstract

In October 2009, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7: Prevenar(TM) Pfizer) was replaced in the Northern Territory childhood vaccination schedule by 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV10; Synflorix™ GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines). This analysis aims to determine whether the reduced prevalence of suppurative otitis media measured in the PHiD-CV10 era was associated with changes in nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage and middle ear discharge (ED) microbiology in vaccinated Indigenous children. Swabs of the NP and ED were collected in remote Indigenous communities between September 2008 and December 2012. Swabs were cultured using standardised methods for otitis media pathogens. Children less than 3 years of age and having received a primary course of 2 or more doses of one PCV formulation and not more than one dose of another PCV formulation were included in the primary analysis; children with non-mixed single formulation PCV schedules were also compared. NP swabs were obtained from 421 of 444 (95 %) children in the PCV7 group and 443 of 451 (98 %) children in the PHiD-CV10 group. Non-mixed PCV schedules were received by 333 (79 %) and 315 (71 %) children, respectively. Pneumococcal (Spn) NP carriage was 76 % and 82 %, and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) carriage was 68 % and 73 %, respectively. ED was obtained from 60 children (85 perforations) in the PCV7 group and from 47 children (59 perforations) in the PHiD-CV10 group. Data from bilateral perforations were combined. Spn was cultured from 25 % and 18 %, respectively, and NTHi was cultured from 61 % and 34 % respectively (p = 0.008). The observed reduction in the prevalence of suppurative OM in this population was not associated with reduced NP carriage of OM pathogens. The prevalence of NTHi-infected ED was lower in PHiD-CV10 vaccinated children compared to PCV7 vaccinated children. Changes in clinical severity may be explained by the action of PHiD-CV10 on NTHi infection in the middle ear. Randomised controlled trials are needed to answer this question.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,111,596
of 8,386,076 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#173
of 1,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,514
of 251,911 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#6
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,386,076 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,092 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,911 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.