Inverse relationship of food and alcohol intake to sleep measures in obesity

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition diabetes, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 169)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
508 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Inverse relationship of food and alcohol intake to sleep measures in obesity
Published in
Nutrition diabetes, January 2013
DOI 10.1038/nutd.2012.33
Pubmed ID
Authors

G Galli, P Piaggi, M S Mattingly, L de Jonge, A B Courville, A Pinchera, F Santini, G Csako, G Cizza

Abstract

Background:Short sleep and weight gain are inversely related. Sleep deprivation acutely increases food intake but little is known about eating behavior in chronically sleep-deprived, obese individuals.Objective:To characterize the relationship between sleep, food intake and alcohol consumption under free-living conditions in obese, chronically sleep-deprived individuals.Design:Cross-sectional study of a cohort of obese men and premenopausal women.Subjects:A total of 118 obese subjects (age: 40.3±6.7 years; 91 females/27 males; body mass index 38.7±6.4 kg m(-2)).Measurements:Energy, macronutrient, alcohol and caffeine intake assessed by 3-day food records. Sleep duration estimated by actigraphy. Respiratory disturbance index assessed by a portable device.Results:Subjects slept 360.7±50.2 min per night and had a total energy intake of 2279.1±689 kcal per day. Sleep duration and energy intake were inversely related (r=-0.230, P=0.015). By extrapolation, each 30-min deficit per day in sleep duration would translate to an ∼83 kcal per day increase in energy intake. In addition, sleep apnea was associated with a shift from carbohydrate to fat intake. Alcohol intake in subjects consuming >3.5 g of alcohol per day (N=41) was inversely related to sleep duration (r=-0.472, P=0.002).Conclusions:Shorter sleep duration and obstructive sleep apnea are associated with higher energy, fat and alcohol intakes in obese individuals. The importance of this study relies on the population studied, obese subjects with chronic sleep deprivation. These novel findings apply to the large segment of the US population who are obese and sleep-deprived.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 508 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Professor 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 26%
Psychology 7 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 244. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2015.
All research outputs
#20,881
of 7,437,486 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition diabetes
#5
of 169 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#671
of 295,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition diabetes
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,437,486 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 169 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,732 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them