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Micro-eukaryotic diversity of the human distal gut microbiota: qualitative assessment using culture-dependent and -independent analysis of faeces

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, July 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
224 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
284 Mendeley
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Title
Micro-eukaryotic diversity of the human distal gut microbiota: qualitative assessment using culture-dependent and -independent analysis of faeces
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, July 2008
DOI 10.1038/ismej.2008.76
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline D Scanlan, Julian R Marchesi

Abstract

Molecular ecological surveys of the human gut microbiota to date have focused on the prokaryotic fraction of the community and have revealed a remarkable degree of bacterial diversity and functionality. However, there is a dearth of information on the eukaryotic composition of the microbiota, and no culture-independent sequence-based surveys of human faeces are available. Culture-independent analyses based on DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction targeting both the total eukaryotic 18S rRNA genes and fungal internal transcribed regions (ITS), together with culture-dependent analyses of fungi, were performed on a group of healthy volunteers. Temporal analysis was also included wherever possible. Collectively, the data presented in this study indicate that eukaryotic diversity of the human gut is low, largely temporally stable and predominated by different subtypes of Blastocystis. Specific analyses of the fungal populations indicate that a disparity exists between the cultivable fraction, which is dominated by Candida sp, and culture-independent analysis, where sequences identical to members of the genera Gloeotinia/Paecilomyces and Galactomyces were most frequently retrieved from both fungal ITS profiles and subsequent clone libraries. Collectively, these results highlight the presence of unprecedented intestinal eukaryotic inhabitants whose functional roles are as yet unknown in healthy individuals. Furthermore, differences between results obtained from traditionally employed culture-based methods and those obtained from culture-independent techniques highlight similar anomalies to that encountered when first analysing the bacterial diversity of the human faecal microbiota using culture-independent surveys.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 284 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
India 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 264 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 67 24%
Researcher 65 23%
Student > Master 39 14%
Student > Bachelor 26 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 6%
Other 44 15%
Unknown 26 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 121 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 39 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 25 9%
Environmental Science 7 2%
Other 24 8%
Unknown 34 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2017.
All research outputs
#172,228
of 8,919,425 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#52
of 1,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,894
of 302,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#2
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,919,425 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,393 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.