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Improving mental health service users’ with medical co-morbidity transition between tertiary medical hospital and primary care services: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Improving mental health service users’ with medical co-morbidity transition between tertiary medical hospital and primary care services: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1567-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate Cranwell, Meg Polacsek, Terence V. McCann

Abstract

Mental health service users have high rates of medical co-morbidity but frequently experience problems accessing and transitioning between tertiary medical and primary care services. The aim of this study was to identify ways to improve service users' with medical co-morbidity care and experience during their transition between tertiary medical hospitals and primary care services. Experience-based co-design (EBCD) qualitative study incorporating a focus group discussion. The study took place in a large tertiary medical service, incorporating three medical hospitals, and primary care services, in Melbourne, Australia. A purposive sample of service users and their caregivers and tertiary medical and primary care clinicians participated in the focus group discussion, in August 2014. A semi-structured interview guide was used to inform data collection. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Thirteen participants took part in the focus group interview, comprising 5 service users, 2 caregivers and 6 clinicians. Five themes were abstracted from the data, illustrating participants' perspectives about factors that facilitated (clinicians' expertise, engagement and accessibility enhancing transition) and presented as barriers (improving access pathways; enhancing communication and continuity of care; improving clinicians' attitudes; and increasing caregiver participation) to service users' progress through tertiary medical and primary care services. A sixth theme, enhancing service users' transition, incorporated three strategies to enhance their transition through tertiary medical and primary care services. EBCD is a useful approach to collaboratively develop strategies to improve service users' with medical co-morbidity and their caregivers' transition between tertiary medical and primary care services. A whole-of-service approach, incorporating policy development and implementation, change of practice philosophy, professional development education and support for clinicians, and acceptance of the need for caregiver participation, is required to improve service users' transition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 13 35%
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 15 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 22%
Psychology 6 16%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,141,851
of 11,224,941 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,990
of 3,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,322
of 260,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#111
of 191 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,224,941 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 191 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.