Myths, presumptions, and facts about obesity.

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 18,881)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
109 news outlets
blogs
28 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
930 tweeters
facebook
159 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
18 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
pinterest
2 Pinners

Readers on

mendeley
744 Mendeley
citeulike
9 CiteULike
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Title
Myths, presumptions, and facts about obesity.
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, January 2013
DOI 10.1056/nejmsa1208051
Pubmed ID
Authors

Krista Casazza, Kevin R. Fontaine, Arne Astrup, Leann L. Birch, Andrew W. Brown, Michelle M. Bohan Brown, Nefertiti Durant, Gareth Dutton, E. Michael Foster, Steven B. Heymsfield, Kerry McIver, Tapan Mehta, Nir Menachemi, P.K. Newby, Russell Pate, Barbara J. Rolls, Bisakha Sen, Daniel L. Smith, Diana M. Thomas, David B. Allison, Casazza K, Fontaine KR, Astrup A, Birch LL, Brown AW, Bohan Brown MM, Durant N, Dutton G, Foster EM, Heymsfield SB, McIver K, Mehta T, Menachemi N, Newby PK, Pate R, Rolls BJ, Sen B, Smith DL Jr, Thomas DM, Allison DB, Casazza, Krista, Daniel L. Smith, Jr., Fontaine, Kevin R., Astrup, Arne, Birch, Leann L., Brown, Andrew W., Bohan Brown, Michelle M., Durant, Nefertiti, Dutton, Gareth, Foster, E. Michael, Heymsfield, Steven B., McIver, Kerry, Mehta, Tapan, Menachemi, Nir, Newby, P.K., Pate, Russell, Rolls, Barbara J., Sen, Bisakha, Smith, Daniel L. Jr., Thomas, Diana M., Allison, David B.

Abstract

Many beliefs about obesity persist in the absence of supporting scientific evidence (presumptions); some persist despite contradicting evidence (myths). The promulgation of unsupported beliefs may yield poorly informed policy decisions, inaccurate clinical and public health recommendations, and an unproductive allocation of research resources and may divert attention away from useful, evidence-based information.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 930 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 744 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 35 5%
Brazil 12 2%
United Kingdom 9 1%
Spain 7 <1%
Italy 6 <1%
Canada 6 <1%
Netherlands 5 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
Other 27 4%
Unknown 630 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 162 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 111 15%
Student > Master 85 11%
Other 73 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 69 9%
Other 244 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 381 51%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 120 16%
Psychology 74 10%
Social Sciences 45 6%
Sports and Recreations 35 5%
Other 89 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1885. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2017.
All research outputs
#269
of 7,430,852 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#16
of 18,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6
of 295,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#2
of 310 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,430,852 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,881 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 310 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.