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Radiocarbon constraints imply reduced carbon uptake by soils during the 21st century

Overview of attention for article published in Science, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
105 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
65 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
275 Mendeley
Title
Radiocarbon constraints imply reduced carbon uptake by soils during the 21st century
Published in
Science, September 2016
DOI 10.1126/science.aad4273
Pubmed ID
Authors

Y. He, S. E. Trumbore, M. S. Torn, J. W. Harden, L. J. S. Vaughn, S. D. Allison, J. T. Randerson

Abstract

Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Many Earth system models (ESMs) estimate a significant soil carbon sink by 2100, yet the underlying carbon dynamics determining this response have not been systematically tested against observations. We used (14)C data from 157 globally distributed soil profiles sampled to 1-meter depth to show that ESMs underestimated the mean age of soil carbon by a factor of more than six (430 ± 50 years versus 3100 ± 1800 years). Consequently, ESMs overestimated the carbon sequestration potential of soils by a factor of nearly two (40 ± 27%). These inconsistencies suggest that ESMs must better represent carbon stabilization processes and the turnover time of slow and passive reservoirs when simulating future atmospheric carbon dioxide dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 105 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 275 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
France 4 1%
Canada 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
French Guiana 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 256 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 84 31%
Researcher 69 25%
Student > Master 30 11%
Unspecified 22 8%
Other 16 6%
Other 54 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 85 31%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 69 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 20%
Unspecified 45 16%
Engineering 7 3%
Other 14 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 221. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2019.
All research outputs
#55,452
of 13,144,984 outputs
Outputs from Science
#2,499
of 61,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,596
of 265,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#75
of 985 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,144,984 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 61,267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,162 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 985 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.