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Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex enhances emotion recognition in depressed patients and controls

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, September 2016
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Title
Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex enhances emotion recognition in depressed patients and controls
Published in
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, September 2016
DOI 10.1080/13803395.2016.1230595
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brennan, Sean, McLoughlin, Declan M, O'Connell, Redmond, Bogue, John, O'Connor, Stephanie, McHugh, Caroline, Glennon, Mark

Abstract

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can enhance a range of neuropsychological functions but its efficacy in addressing clinically significant emotion recognition deficits associated with depression is largely untested. A randomized crossover placebo controlled study was used to investigate the effects of tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC) on a range of neuropsychological variables associated with depression as well as neural activity in the associated brain region. A series of computerized tests was administered to clinical (n = 17) and control groups (n = 20) during sham and anodal (1.5 mA) stimulation. Anodal tDCS led to a significant main effect for overall emotion recognition (p = .02), with a significant improvement in the control group (p = .04). Recognition of disgust was significantly greater in the clinical group (p = .01). Recognition of anger was significantly improved for the clinical group (p = .04) during anodal stimulation. Differences between groups for each of the six emotions at varying levels of expression found that at 40% during anodal stimulation, happy recognition significantly improved for the clinical group (p = .01). Anger recognition at 80% during anodal stimulation significantly improved for the clinical group (p = .02). These improvements were observed in the absence of any change in psychomotor speed or trail making ability during anodal stimulation. Working memory significantly improved during anodal stimulation for the clinical group but not for controls (p = .03). The tentative findings of this study indicate that tDCS can have a neuromodulatory effect on a range of neuropsychological variables. However, it is clear that there was a wide variation in responses to tDCS and that individual difference and different approaches to testing and stimulation have a significant impact on final outcomes. Nonetheless, tDCS remains a promising tool for future neuropsychological research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Student > Master 17 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Researcher 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 20 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 37 34%
Neuroscience 16 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Arts and Humanities 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 27 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2016.
All research outputs
#8,788,311
of 11,041,735 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
#428
of 566 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,466
of 259,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
#12
of 16 outputs
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