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Inefficient antimicrobial functions of innate phagocytes render infant mice more susceptible to bacterial infection

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Immunology, March 2013
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Title
Inefficient antimicrobial functions of innate phagocytes render infant mice more susceptible to bacterial infection
Published in
European Journal of Immunology, March 2013
DOI 10.1002/eji.201243077
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qi Zhang, Andrew P. Coveney, Shenglin Yu, Jing Hua Liu, Yiping Li, Siobhan Blankson, H. Paul Redmond, Jiang Huai Wang, Jian Wang

Abstract

Neonates and infants, due to the immaturity in their adaptive immunity, are thought to depend largely on the innate immune system for protection against bacterial infection. However, the innate immunity-mediated antimicrobial response in neonates and infants is incompletely characterized. Here, we report that infant mice were more susceptible to microbial sepsis than adult mice, with significantly reduced bacterial clearance from the circulation and visceral organs. Infant PMNs exhibited less constitutive expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, and bacterial infection caused further reduction of PMN CXCR2 in infant mice compared with adult mice. This correlates with diminished in vitro chemotaxis of infant PMNs toward the chemoattractant CXCL2 and impaired in vivo recruitment of infant PMNs into the infectious site. Furthermore, consistent with the reduced antimicrobial response in vivo, infant macrophages displayed an impaired bactericidal activity with a defect in phagosome maturation after ingestion of either gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria. Thus, infant mice exhibit an increased vulnerability to microbial infection with delayed bacterial clearance, which is associated with the inefficiency in their innate phagocyte-associated antimicrobial functions characterized by defects in PMN recruitment and macrophage phagosome maturation during microbial sepsis.

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The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 X user who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 6%
Unknown 30 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2013.
All research outputs
#20,000,155
of 24,577,646 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Immunology
#6,328
of 6,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,363
of 201,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Immunology
#23
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,577,646 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,814 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,316 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.