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Why Equitable Access to Vaginal Birth Requires Abolition of Race-Based Medicine

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2022
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19 tweeters

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Title
Why Equitable Access to Vaginal Birth Requires Abolition of Race-Based Medicine
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2022
DOI 10.1001/amajethics.2022.233
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas Rubashkin

Abstract

In 2010, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network developed a decision aid, the Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC) calculator, to help clinicians discern how one variable (race) might influence patients' success in delivering a baby vaginally following a prior birth by cesarean. The higher rate of cesarean deliveries among Black and Hispanic women in the United States has long demonstrated racial inequities in obstetrical care, however. Although the MFMU's new VBAC calculator no longer includes race or ethnicity, in response to calls for abolition of race-based medicine, this article argues that VBAC calculator use has never been race neutral. In fact, VBAC calculator use in the United States is laced with racism, compromises patients' autonomy, and undermines informed consent.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 1 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 17%
Unknown 3 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Unknown 3 50%