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Large-scale recovery of an endangered amphibian despite ongoing exposure to multiple stressors

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
85 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
88 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
206 Mendeley
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Title
Large-scale recovery of an endangered amphibian despite ongoing exposure to multiple stressors
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1600983113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roland A. Knapp, Gary M. Fellers, Patrick M. Kleeman, David A. W. Miller, Vance T. Vredenburg, Erica Bree Rosenblum, Cheryl J. Briggs

Abstract

Amphibians are one of the most threatened animal groups, with 32% of species at risk for extinction. Given this imperiled status, is the disappearance of a large fraction of the Earth's amphibians inevitable, or are some declining species more resilient than is generally assumed? We address this question in a species that is emblematic of many declining amphibians, the endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae). Based on >7,000 frog surveys conducted across Yosemite National Park over a 20-y period, we show that, after decades of decline and despite ongoing exposure to multiple stressors, including introduced fish, the recently emerged disease chytridiomycosis, and pesticides, R. sierrae abundance increased sevenfold during the study and at a rate of 11% per year. These increases occurred in hundreds of populations throughout Yosemite, providing a rare example of amphibian recovery at an ecologically relevant spatial scale. Results from a laboratory experiment indicate that these increases may be in part because of reduced frog susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. The disappearance of nonnative fish from numerous water bodies after cessation of stocking also contributed to the recovery. The large-scale increases in R. sierrae abundance that we document suggest that, when habitats are relatively intact and stressors are reduced in their importance by active management or species' adaptive responses, declines of some amphibians may be partially reversible, at least at a regional scale. Other studies conducted over similarly large temporal and spatial scales are critically needed to provide insight and generality about the reversibility of amphibian declines at a global scale.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 85 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 206 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 199 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 41 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 19%
Student > Master 33 16%
Student > Bachelor 20 10%
Other 15 7%
Other 34 17%
Unknown 23 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 109 53%
Environmental Science 42 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 1%
Unspecified 2 <1%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 29 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 314. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2020.
All research outputs
#72,586
of 20,495,493 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,747
of 94,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,020
of 289,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#46
of 953 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,495,493 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 94,417 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,995 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 953 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.