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Development of SmokeFree Baby: a smoking cessation smartphone app for pregnant smokers

Overview of attention for article published in Translational Behavioral Medicine, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
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Title
Development of SmokeFree Baby: a smoking cessation smartphone app for pregnant smokers
Published in
Translational Behavioral Medicine, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s13142-016-0438-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ildiko Tombor, Lion Shahab, Jamie Brown, David Crane, Susan Michie, Robert West

Abstract

Pregnant smokers may benefit from digital smoking cessation interventions, but few have been designed for this population. The aim was to transparently report the development of a smartphone app designed to aid smoking cessation during pregnancy. The development of a smartphone app ('SmokeFree Baby') to help pregnant women stop smoking was guided by frameworks for developing complex interventions, including the Medical Research Council (MRC), Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) and Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW). Two integrative behaviour change theories provided the theoretical base. Evidence from the scientific literature and behaviour change techniques (BCTs) from the BCT Taxonomy v1 informed the intervention content. The app was developed around five core modules, each with a distinct intervention target (identity change, stress management, health information, promoting use of face-to-face support and behavioural substitution) and available in a 'control' or 'full' version. SmokeFree Baby has been developed as part of a multiphase intervention optimization to identify the optimum combination of intervention components to include in smartphone apps to help pregnant smokers stop smoking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 21%
Student > Bachelor 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Researcher 5 6%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 14 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 23 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 17%
Computer Science 5 6%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 20 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,051,910
of 12,494,470 outputs
Outputs from Translational Behavioral Medicine
#304
of 518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,520
of 265,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Translational Behavioral Medicine
#14
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,494,470 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 518 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,474 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.