↓ Skip to main content

Imaging the implant-soft tissue interactions in total knee arthroplasty

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Imaging the implant-soft tissue interactions in total knee arthroplasty
Published in
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40634-016-0061-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michel P. Bonnin, Tom Van Hoof, Arnoud De Kok, Matthias Verstraete, Catherine Van der Straeten, Mo Saffarini, Jan Victor

Abstract

In Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), residual pain may be secondary to soft tissue impingements, which are difficult to visualize around chromium-cobalt implants using medical imaging, so their interactions remain poorly understood. The goal of this work was to establish a protocol for in-vitro imaging of the soft tissues around TKA, usable during throughout the range of motion (ROM). The full size range of a commercially available TKA prosthesis was manufactured by 3D-printing in non-magnetic and non-radiopaque polymer and implanted in 12 cadaveric knees. The relations between these implants and the soft tissues (Popliteus tendon, Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligament, Patellar and Quadriceps tendons) were analyzed, using MRI (5 embalmed specimens) and CT scans after injection of the tissues with barium-sulfate (3 embalmed and 4 fresh-frozen specimens). Both MRI and CT scans enabled good identification of the soft tissues before TKA implantation. MRI produced minimal loss in signal and contrast, and neither the low temperature nor the embalming fluids compromised image quality. CT scans were more precise after TKA implantation, particularly the borders of the implant and the differentiation of soft tissues. Full ROM investigation, manual segmentation and three-dimensional reconstructions were possible only with the CT scan. The experimental approach described in this study was successful in visualizing the interactions between the soft tissue and the implants before and after TKA and during the full ROM. The coordinate system allows to localize precisely the different anatomic structures and to quantify any change due to prosthetic implantation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Other 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 46%
Engineering 2 15%
Neuroscience 1 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,920,032
of 9,081,658 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#21
of 35 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,849
of 257,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,081,658 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 35 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one scored the same or higher as 14 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.