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The genetics of breast cancer risk in the post-genome era: thoughts on study design to move past BRCA and towards clinical relevance

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
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Title
The genetics of breast cancer risk in the post-genome era: thoughts on study design to move past BRCA and towards clinical relevance
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13058-016-0759-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew D. Skol, Mark M. Sasaki, Kenan Onel

Abstract

More than 12 % of women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. Although there have been tremendous advances in elucidating genetic risk factors underlying both familial and sporadic breast cancer, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer etiology remains unknown. The discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 over 20 years ago remains the seminal event in the field and has paved the way for the discovery of other high-penetrance susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. The advent of genome-wide association studies made possible the next wave of discoveries, in which over 80 low-penetrance and moderate-penetrance variants were identified. Although these studies were highly successful at discovering variants associated with both familial and sporadic breast cancer, the variants identified to date explain only 50 % of the heritability of breast cancer. In this review, we look back at the investigative strategies that have led to our current understanding of breast cancer genetics, consider the challenges of performing association studies in heterogeneous complex diseases such as breast cancer, and look ahead toward the types of study designs that may lead to the identification of the genetic variation accounting for the remaining missing heritability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 <1%
Unknown 126 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 24%
Student > Master 20 16%
Student > Bachelor 19 15%
Researcher 16 13%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 21 17%
Unknown 12 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 42 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 2%
Engineering 3 2%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 17 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,694,307
of 8,487,569 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#507
of 1,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,608
of 253,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#10
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,487,569 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,049 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.