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Predicting animal home‐range structure and transitions using a multistate Ornstein‐Uhlenbeck biased random walk

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, November 2016
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3 tweeters

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31 Dimensions

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Title
Predicting animal home‐range structure and transitions using a multistate Ornstein‐Uhlenbeck biased random walk
Published in
Ecology, November 2016
DOI 10.1002/ecy.1615
Pubmed ID
Authors

Greg A. Breed, Emily A. Golson, M. Tim Tinker

Abstract

The home-range concept is central in animal ecology and behavior, and numerous mechanistic models have been developed to understand home range formation and maintenance. These mechanistic models usually assume a single, contiguous home range. Here we describe and implement a simple home-range model that can accommodate multiple home-range centers, form complex shapes, allow discontinuities in use patterns, and infer how external and internal variables affect movement and use patterns. The model assumes individuals associate with two or more home-range centers and move among them with some estimable probability. Movement in and around home-range centers is governed by a two-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, while transitions between centers are modeled as a stochastic state-switching process. We augmented this base model by introducing environmental and demographic covariates that modify transition probabilities between home-range centers and can be estimated to provide insight into the movement process. We demonstrate the model using telemetry data from sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in California. The model was fit using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which estimated transition probabilities, as well as unique Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion and centralizing tendency parameters. Estimated parameters could then be used to simulate movement and space use that was virtually indistinguishable from real data. We used Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) scores to assess model fit and determined that both wind and reproductive status were predictive of transitions between home-range centers. Females were less likely to move between home-range centers on windy days, less likely to move between centers when tending pups, and much more likely to move between centers just after weaning a pup. These tendencies are predicted by theoretical movement rules but were not previously known and show that our model can extract meaningful behavioral insight from complex movement data.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 113 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 21%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 4%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 14 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 56%
Environmental Science 16 14%
Mathematics 4 3%
Physics and Astronomy 4 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 16 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2017.
All research outputs
#12,718,918
of 19,298,685 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#5,054
of 6,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,252
of 281,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#82
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,298,685 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,187 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,008 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.