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Towards the just and sustainable use of antibiotics

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 190)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
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Title
Towards the just and sustainable use of antibiotics
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40545-016-0083-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gemma L. Buckland Merrett, Gerald Bloom, Annie Wilkinson, Hayley MacGregor

Abstract

The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant pathogens poses a big challenge to policy-makers, who need to oversee the transformation of health systems that evolved to provide easy access to these drugs into ones that encourage appropriate use of antimicrobials, whilst reducing the risk of resistance. This is a particular challenge for low and middle-income countries with pluralistic health systems where antibiotics are available in a number of different markets. This review paper considers access and use of antibiotics in these countries from a complex adaptive system perspective. It highlights the main areas of intervention that could provide the key to addressing the sustainable long term use and availability of antibiotics. A focus on the synergies between interventions addressing access strategies, antibiotic quality, diagnostics for low-resource settings, measures to encourage just and sustainable decision making and help seeking optimal therapeutic and dosing strategies are key levers for the sustainable future of antibiotic use. Successful integration of such strategies will be dependent on effective governance mechanisms, effective partnerships and coalition building and accurate evaluation systems at national, regional and global levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Unknown 96 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 29%
Researcher 24 24%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 7 7%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 9%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Other 21 21%
Unknown 12 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2017.
All research outputs
#1,317,531
of 14,292,173 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#25
of 190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,047
of 268,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,292,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them