↓ Skip to main content

Mechanical contributors to sex differences in idiopathic knee osteoarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, January 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Mechanical contributors to sex differences in idiopathic knee osteoarthritis
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/2042-6410-3-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel P Nicolella, Mary I O’Connor, Roger M Enoka, Barbara D Boyan, David A Hart, Eileen Resnick, Karen J Berkley, Kathleen A Sluka, C Kent Kwoh, Laura L Tosi, Richard D Coutts, Lorena M Havill, Wendy M Kohrt

Abstract

The occurrence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) increases with age and is more common in women compared with men, especially after the age of 50 years. Recent work suggests that contact stress in the knee cartilage is a significant predictor of the risk for developing knee OA. Significant gaps in knowledge remain, however, as to how changes in musculoskeletal traits disturb the normal mechanical environment of the knee and contribute to sex differences in the initiation and progression of idiopathic knee OA. To illustrate this knowledge deficit, we summarize what is known about the influence of limb alignment, muscle function, and obesity on sex differences in knee OA. Observational data suggest that limb alignment can predict the development of radiographic signs of knee OA, potentially due to increased stresses and strains within the joint. However, these data do not indicate how limb alignment could contribute to sex differences in either the development or worsening of knee OA. Similarly, the strength of the knee extensor muscles is compromised in women who develop radiographic and symptomatic signs of knee OA, but the extent to which the decline in muscle function precedes the development of the disease is uncertain. Even less is known about how changes in muscle function might contribute to the worsening of knee OA. Conversely, obesity is a stronger predictor of developing knee OA symptoms in women than in men. The influence of obesity on developing knee OA symptoms is not associated with deviation in limb alignment, but BMI predicts the worsening of the symptoms only in individuals with neutral and valgus (knock-kneed) knees. It is more likely, however, that obesity modulates OA through a combination of systemic effects, particularly an increase in inflammatory cytokines, and mechanical factors within the joint. The absence of strong associations of these surrogate measures of the mechanical environment in the knee joint with sex differences in the development and progression of knee OA suggests that a more multifactorial and integrative approach in the study of this disease is needed. We identify gaps in knowledge related to mechanical influences on the sex differences in knee OA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 27%
Student > Postgraduate 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 24%
Engineering 9 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Sports and Recreations 4 8%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2013.
All research outputs
#6,806,120
of 11,891,057 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#135
of 198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,001
of 131,508 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,891,057 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 198 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,508 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.