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Factors associated with attitudes and beliefs of elders with acute low back pain: data from the study Back Complaints in the Elders (BACE)

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian journal of physical therapy, December 2016
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Title
Factors associated with attitudes and beliefs of elders with acute low back pain: data from the study Back Complaints in the Elders (BACE)
Published in
Brazilian journal of physical therapy, December 2016
DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0188
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luiza F. Teixeira, Leani S. M. Pereira, Silvia L. A. Silva, João M. D. Dias, Rosângela C. Dias

Abstract

The attitudes and beliefs that older people have about acute low back pain (LBP) may influence the coping mechanisms and the adoption of treatment strategies in this population. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with the attitudes and beliefs of elderly patients with acute low back pain using the Back Beliefs Questionnaire. This is a cross-sectional study with a subsample of the study "Back Complaints in the Elders" (BACE), composed of 532 older Brazilians of both genders with acute LBP. We investigated sociodemographic and clinical aspects, self-perceived health, psychosocial and emotional state, falls, and functional capacity. Multiple regression models were constructed to measure possible associations. The percentage of female participants was 85.7% and the mean age was 69.04 (SD=6.2). Disability, symptoms of depression, and expectation of return to activities were independently associated with attitudes and beliefs concerning LBP. Screening of psychosocial factors is essential to the prevention of persistent and recurrent LBP. Early signs of these factors can help identify symptoms and behaviors for effective interventions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 20%
Psychology 5 7%
Neuroscience 5 7%
Sports and Recreations 4 6%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 24 35%