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Bifenthrin Causes Trophic Cascade and Altered Insect Emergence in Mesocosms: Implications for Small Streams

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Bifenthrin Causes Trophic Cascade and Altered Insect Emergence in Mesocosms: Implications for Small Streams
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, October 2016
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b02761
Pubmed ID
Authors

Holly A. Rogers, Travis S. Schmidt, Brittanie L. Dabney, Michelle L. Hladik, Barbara J. Mahler, Peter C. Van Metre

Abstract

Direct and indirect ecological effects of the widely used insecticide bifenthrin on stream ecosystems are largely unknown. To investigate such effects, a manipulative experiment was conducted in stream mesocosms that were colonized by aquatic insect communities and exposed to bifenthrin-contaminated sediment; implications for natural streams were interpreted through comparison of mesocosm results to a survey of 100 Midwestern streams, USA. In the mesocosm experiment, direct effects of bifenthrin exposure included reduced larval macroinvertebrate abundance, richness, and biomass at concentrations (EC50's ranged from 197.6 to 233.5 ng bifenthrin/g organic carbon) previously thought safe for aquatic life. Indirect effects included a trophic cascade in which periphyton abundance increased after macroinvertebrate scrapers decreased. Adult emergence dynamics and corresponding terrestrial subsidies were altered at all bifenthrin concentrations tested. Extrapolating these results to the Midwestern stream assessment suggests pervasive ecological effects, with altered emergence dynamics likely in 40% of streams and a trophic cascade in 7% of streams. This study provides new evidence that a common pyrethroid might alter aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem function at the regional scale.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 39 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 24%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 31%
Engineering 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2018.
All research outputs
#562,898
of 14,453,326 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#882
of 14,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,488
of 268,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#34
of 260 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,453,326 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,144 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,432 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 260 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.