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Variation in ligand responses of the bitter taste receptors TAS2R1 and TAS2R4 among New World monkeys

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Variation in ligand responses of the bitter taste receptors TAS2R1 and TAS2R4 among New World monkeys
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-016-0783-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kei Tsutsui, Masahiro Otoh, Kodama Sakurai, Nami Suzuki-Hashido, Takashi Hayakawa, Takumi Misaka, Yoshiro Ishimaru, Filippo Aureli, Amanda D. Melin, Shoji Kawamura, Hiroo Imai

Abstract

New World monkeys (NWMs) are unique in that they exhibit remarkable interspecific variation in color vision and feeding behavior, making them an excellent model for studying sensory ecology. However, it is largely unknown whether non-visual senses co-vary with feeding ecology, especially gustation, which is expected to be indispensable in food selection. Bitter taste, which is mediated by bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) in the tongue, helps organisms avoid ingesting potentially toxic substances in food. In this study, we compared the ligand sensitivities of the TAS2Rs of five species of NWMs by heterologous expression in HEK293T cells and calcium imaging. We found that TAS2R1 and TAS2R4 orthologs differ in sensitivity among the NWM species for colchicine and camphor, respectively. We then reconstructed the ancestral receptors of NWM TAS2R1 and TAS2R4, measured the evolutionary shift in ligand sensitivity, and identified the amino acid replacement at residue 62 as responsible for the high sensitivity of marmoset TAS2R4 to colchicine. Our results provide a basis for understanding the differences in feeding ecology among NWMs with respect to bitter taste.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 4 17%
Student > Master 4 17%
Professor 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Lecturer 3 13%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2016.
All research outputs
#1,103,966
of 8,629,768 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#466
of 2,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,495
of 253,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#26
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,629,768 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,032 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,117 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.