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Partial liquid ventilation for the prevention of mortality and morbidity in paediatric acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2013
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Title
Partial liquid ventilation for the prevention of mortality and morbidity in paediatric acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2013
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd003845.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alka Kaushal, Conor G McDonnell, Mark William Davies

Abstract

Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are syndromes of severe respiratory failure. Children with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome have high mortality and the survivors have significant morbidity. Partial liquid ventilation is proposed as a less injurious form of respiratory support for these children. Uncontrolled studies in adults have shown improvements in gas exchange and lung compliance with partial liquid ventilation. A single uncontrolled study in six children with acute respiratory syndrome showed some improvement in gas exchange during three hours of partial liquid ventilation. This review was originally published in 2004, updated in 2009 and again in 2012.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 4%
France 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 74 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Unspecified 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Other 23 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 47%
Unspecified 17 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 15%
Psychology 4 5%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 5 6%