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National improvements in resident physician-reported patient safety after limiting first-year resident physicians’ extended duration work shifts: a pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Quality & Safety, May 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 1,803)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
578 tweeters
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
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Title
National improvements in resident physician-reported patient safety after limiting first-year resident physicians’ extended duration work shifts: a pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies
Published in
BMJ Quality & Safety, May 2022
DOI 10.1136/bmjqs-2021-014375
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew D Weaver, Christopher P Landrigan, Jason P Sullivan, Conor S O'Brien, Salim Qadri, Natalie Viyaran, Charles A Czeisler, Laura K Barger

Abstract

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) enacted a policy in 2011 that restricted first-year resident physicians in the USA to work no more than 16 consecutive hours. This was rescinded in 2017. We conducted a nationwide prospective cohort study of resident physicians for 5 academic years (2002-2007) before and for 3 academic years (2014-2017) after implementation of the 16 hours 2011 ACGME work-hour limit. Our analyses compare trends in resident physician-reported medical errors between the two cohorts to evaluate the impact of this policy change. 14 796 residents provided data describing 78 101 months of direct patient care. After adjustment for potential confounders, the work-hour policy was associated with a 32% reduced risk of resident physician-reported significant medical errors (rate ratio (RR) 0.68; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.72), a 34% reduced risk of reported preventable adverse events (RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.74) and a 63% reduced risk of reported medical errors resulting in patient death (RR 0.37; 95% CI 0.28 to 0.49). These findings have broad relevance for those who work in and receive care from academic hospitals in the USA. The decision to lift this work hour policy in 2017 may expose patients to preventable harm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 578 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Unknown 4 57%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Unknown 4 57%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 497. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2022.
All research outputs
#40,184
of 22,190,504 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Quality & Safety
#10
of 1,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,187
of 342,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Quality & Safety
#1
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,190,504 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,803 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,348 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.