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Effects of balance training using a virtual-reality system in older fallers

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
110 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
462 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Effects of balance training using a virtual-reality system in older fallers
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, February 2013
DOI 10.2147/cia.s41453
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gustavo Duque, Boersma, Loza-Diaz, Hassan, Hamlet Suarez, Geisinger, Suriyaarachchi, Sharma, Demontiero

Abstract

Poor balance is considered a challenging risk factor for falls in older adults. Therefore, innovative interventions for balance improvement in this population are greatly needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new virtual-reality system (the Balance Rehabilitation Unit [BRU]) on balance, falls, and fear of falling in a population of community-dwelling older subjects with a known history of falls. In this study, 60 community-dwelling older subjects were recruited after being diagnosed with poor balance at the Falls and Fractures Clinic, Nepean Hospital (Penrith, NSW, Australia). Subjects were randomly assigned to either the BRU-training or control groups. Both groups received the usual falls prevention care. The BRU-training group attended balance training (two sessions/week for 6 weeks) using an established protocol. Change in balance parameters was assessed in the BRU-training group at the end of their 6-week training program. Both groups were assessed 9 months after their initial assessment (month 0). Adherence to the BRU-training program was 97%. Balance parameters were significantly improved in the BRU-training group (P < 0.01). This effect was also associated with a significant reduction in falls and lower levels of fear of falling (P < 0.01). Some components of balance that were improved by BRU training showed a decline after 9 months post-training. In conclusion, BRU training is an effective and well-accepted intervention to improve balance, increase confidence, and prevent falls in the elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 462 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 449 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 90 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 16%
Student > Bachelor 68 15%
Researcher 45 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 6%
Other 86 19%
Unknown 73 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 86 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 78 17%
Sports and Recreations 41 9%
Engineering 33 7%
Computer Science 27 6%
Other 96 21%
Unknown 101 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2019.
All research outputs
#2,977,280
of 15,734,993 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#376
of 1,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,093
of 152,400 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#5
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,734,993 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,511 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 152,400 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.