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Aspects of Facial Contrast Decrease with Age and Are Cues for Age Perception

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
387 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
Aspects of Facial Contrast Decrease with Age and Are Cues for Age Perception
Published in
PLoS ONE, March 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0057985
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aurélie Porcheron, Emmanuelle Mauger, Richard Russell

Abstract

Age is a primary social dimension. We behave differently toward people as a function of how old we perceive them to be. Age perception relies on cues that are correlated with age, such as wrinkles. Here we report that aspects of facial contrast-the contrast between facial features and the surrounding skin-decreased with age in a large sample of adult Caucasian females. These same aspects of facial contrast were also significantly correlated with the perceived age of the faces. Individual faces were perceived as younger when these aspects of facial contrast were artificially increased, but older when these aspects of facial contrast were artificially decreased. These findings show that facial contrast plays a role in age perception, and that faces with greater facial contrast look younger. Because facial contrast is increased by typical cosmetics use, we infer that cosmetics function in part by making the face appear younger.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 387 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
France 2 2%
Puerto Rico 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 84 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 22%
Student > Master 10 11%
Other 10 11%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Other 20 22%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 38 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 11%
Computer Science 5 6%
Engineering 1 1%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 17 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 219. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2020.
All research outputs
#93,393
of 17,449,565 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#1,679
of 165,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#643
of 158,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#48
of 4,663 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,449,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165,279 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,981 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,663 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.