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Reversing the Genomic, Epigenetic, and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer–Enhancing Effects of Obesity

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Prevention Research, June 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Readers on

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3 Mendeley
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Title
Reversing the Genomic, Epigenetic, and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer–Enhancing Effects of Obesity
Published in
Cancer Prevention Research, June 2022
DOI 10.1158/1940-6207.capr-22-0113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura W. Bowers, Steven S. Doerstling, Meghana G. Shamsunder, Claire G. Lineberger, Emily L. Rossi, Stephanie A. Montgomery, Michael F. Coleman, Weida Gong, Joel S. Parker, Anthony Howell, Michelle Harvie, Stephen D. Hursting

Abstract

The reversibility of the procancer effects of obesity was interrogated in formerly obese C57BL/6 mice that lost weight via a nonrestricted low-fat diet (LFD) or 3 distinct calorie-restricted (CR) regimens (low-fat CR, Mediterranean-style CR, or intermittent CR). These mice, along with continuously obese mice and lean control mice, were orthotopically injected with E0771 cells, a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Tumor weight, systemic cytokines, and incidence of lung metastases were elevated in the continuously obese and nonrestricted LFD mice relative to the 3 CR groups. Gene expression differed between the obese and all CR groups, but not the nonrestricted LFD group, for numerous tumoral genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as several genes in the normal mammary tissue associated with hypoxia, reactive oxygen species production and p53 signaling. A high degree of concordance existed between differentially expressed mammary tissue genes from obese versus all CR mice and a microarray dataset from overweight/obese women randomized to either no intervention or a CR diet. Assessment of differentially methylated regions in mouse mammary tissues revealed that obesity, relative to the 4 weight loss groups, was associated with significant DNA hypermethylation. However, the anticancer effects of the CR interventions were independent of their ability to reverse obesity-associated mammary epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, these preclinical data showing that the procancer effects of obesity are reversible by various forms of CR diets strongly support translational exploration of restricted dietary patterns for reducing the burden of obesity-associated cancers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 67%
Lecturer 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2022.
All research outputs
#6,568,026
of 22,132,418 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Prevention Research
#556
of 1,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,421
of 343,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Prevention Research
#11
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,132,418 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,336 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.