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The ACACA gene is a potential candidate gene for fat content in sheep milk

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Genetics, March 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
The ACACA gene is a potential candidate gene for fat content in sheep milk
Published in
Animal Genetics, March 2013
DOI 10.1111/age.12036
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Moioli, M. C. Scatà, G. De Matteis, G. Annicchiarico, G. Catillo, F. Napolitano

Abstract

No major gene has yet been reported in sheep that explains the variation of milk fat content. The coding region of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACACA) gene, which plays an important role in de novo fatty acid synthesis, had been investigated, but no non-synonymous mutations have been reported. In this study, the genomic regions encoding the three promoters of the ACACA gene were directly sequenced in 264 sheep of three different breeds, and 10 SNPs were identified. Allele frequencies of most SNPs significantly differed (P = 0.05-0.0001) between breeds. The SNPs that potentially altered either gene regulatory elements or putative binding sites of transcription factors were made evident through in silico analysis. The association analysis with milk traits, performed for one SNP of PIII (GenBank AJ292286, g.1330G>T), showed a significant allelic substitution effect (+0.33%, P < 0.0001 and +0.35%, P < 0.01) in the Altamurana and Gentile breeds respectively. Because this SNP was located in the binding site of the paired box protein transcription factors, which was shown to function as an efficient promoter element, and because PIII transcripts are expressed in the mammary gland, the SNP in PIII of the ACACA gene might affect the variation of fat content in sheep milk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 25%
Unspecified 3 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 50%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 19%
Unspecified 3 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2013.
All research outputs
#6,672,546
of 12,354,561 outputs
Outputs from Animal Genetics
#436
of 861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,187
of 143,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Genetics
#8
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,561 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 861 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,621 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.