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Rapid submarine ice melting in the grounding zones of ice shelves in West Antarctica

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
79 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
89 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
Title
Rapid submarine ice melting in the grounding zones of ice shelves in West Antarctica
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms13243
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ala Khazendar, Eric Rignot, Dustin M. Schroeder, Helene Seroussi, Michael P. Schodlok, Bernd Scheuchl, Jeremie Mouginot, Tyler C. Sutterley, Isabella Velicogna

Abstract

Enhanced submarine ice-shelf melting strongly controls ice loss in the Amundsen Sea embayment (ASE) of West Antarctica, but its magnitude is not well known in the critical grounding zones of the ASE's major glaciers. Here we directly quantify bottom ice losses along tens of kilometres with airborne radar sounding of the Dotson and Crosson ice shelves, which buttress the rapidly changing Smith, Pope and Kohler glaciers. Melting in the grounding zones is found to be much higher than steady-state levels, removing 300-490 m of solid ice between 2002 and 2009 beneath the retreating Smith Glacier. The vigorous, unbalanced melting supports the hypothesis that a significant increase in ocean heat influx into ASE sub-ice-shelf cavities took place in the mid-2000s. The synchronous but diverse evolutions of these glaciers illustrate how combinations of oceanography and topography modulate rapid submarine melting to hasten mass loss and glacier retreat from West Antarctica.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 4%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 113 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 24%
Student > Master 23 19%
Professor 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 4%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 11 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 84 68%
Environmental Science 11 9%
Physics and Astronomy 6 5%
Engineering 3 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 14 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 735. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2019.
All research outputs
#8,111
of 14,012,456 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#151
of 25,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#451
of 290,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#30
of 2,999 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,012,456 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 25,748 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,337 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,999 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.