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Four New Species ofEimeria(Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) fromEmoiaspp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Parasitology, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

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Citations

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Title
Four New Species ofEimeria(Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) fromEmoiaspp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific
Published in
Journal of Parasitology, February 2017
DOI 10.1645/16-67
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris T. McAllister, Donald W. Duszynski, Christopher C. Austin, Robert N. Fisher

Abstract

Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species including 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white- spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and their feces examined for coccidians. Oocysts of 4 species of eimerians (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 µm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 µm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found to be shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. impar from the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidiceps from PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicauda were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 µm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria emoia n. sp. from Em. longicauda from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall, 29.2 × 15.7 µm, L/W 1.9. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. These are the first eimerians reported from Emoia spp., and adds to our growing knowledge of the coccidian fauna of scincid lizards of the South Pacific.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 29%
Other 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 57%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 14%
Environmental Science 1 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2017.
All research outputs
#6,952,670
of 13,524,702 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Parasitology
#1,322
of 1,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,754
of 291,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Parasitology
#7
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,524,702 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,754 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.