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Folklore and Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Geckos in Southern Portugal: Implications for Conservation and Science

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, January 2011
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Folklore and Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Geckos in Southern Portugal: Implications for Conservation and Science
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-7-26
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luis M P Ceriaco, Mariana P Marques, Natalia C Madeira, Carlos M Vila-Vicosa, Paula Mendes

Abstract

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and folklore are repositories of large amounts of information about the natural world. Ideas, perceptions and empirical data held by human communities regarding local species are important sources which enable new scientific discoveries to be made, as well as offering the potential to solve a number of conservation problems. We documented the gecko-related folklore and TEK of the people of southern Portugal, with the particular aim of understanding the main ideas relating to gecko biology and ecology. Our results suggest that local knowledge of gecko ecology and biology is both accurate and relevant. As a result of information provided by local inhabitants, knowledge of the current geographic distribution of Hemidactylus turcicus was expanded, with its presence reported in nine new locations. It was also discovered that locals still have some misconceptions of geckos as poisonous and carriers of dermatological diseases. The presence of these ideas has led the population to a fear of and aversion to geckos, resulting in direct persecution being one of the major conservation problems facing these animals. It is essential, from both a scientific and conservationist perspective, to understand the knowledge and perceptions that people have towards the animals, since, only then, may hitherto unrecognized pertinent information and conservation problems be detected and resolved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 3 4%
Chile 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 77 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Student > Bachelor 15 18%
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 43%
Environmental Science 17 20%
Social Sciences 9 11%
Arts and Humanities 4 5%
Linguistics 2 2%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 6 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2020.
All research outputs
#10,231,421
of 16,607,885 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#463
of 655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,874
of 186,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#9
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,607,885 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 655 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.