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Characterisation of sleep in intensive care using 24-hour polysomnography: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, March 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
55 tweeters

Citations

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197 Dimensions

Readers on

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184 Mendeley
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Title
Characterisation of sleep in intensive care using 24-hour polysomnography: an observational study
Published in
Critical Care, March 2013
DOI 10.1186/cc12565
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosalind Elliott, Sharon McKinley, Peter Cistulli, Mary Fien, Elliott R, McKinley S, Cistulli P, Fien M

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Many intensive care patients experience sleep disruption potentially related to noise, light and treatment interventions. The purpose of this study was to characterise, in terms of quantity and quality, the sleep of intensive care patients, taking into account the impact of environmental factors. METHODS: This observational study was conducted in the adult ICU of a tertiary referral hospital in Australia, enrolling 57 patients. Polysomnography (PSG) was performed over a 24-hour period to assess the quantity (total sleep time: hh:mm) and quality (percentage per stage, duration of sleep episode) of patients' sleep while in ICU. Rechtschaffen and Kales criteria were used to categorise sleep. Interrater checks were performed. Sound pressure and illuminance levels and care events were simultaneously recorded. Patients reported on their sleep quality in ICU using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and the Sleep in Intensive Care Questionnaire. Data were summarised using frequencies and proportions or measures of central tendency and dispersion as appropriate and Cohen's Kappa statistic was used for interrater reliability of the sleep data analysis. RESULTS: Patients' median total sleep time was 05:00 (IQR: 02:52 to 07:14). The majority of sleep was stage 1 and 2 (medians: 19 and 73%) with scant slow wave and REM sleep. The median duration of sleep without waking was 00:03. Sound levels were high (mean Leq 53.95 dB(A) during the day and 50.20 dB(A) at night) and illuminance levels were appropriate at night (median <2 lux) but low during the day (median: 74.20 lux). There was a median 1.7 care events/h. Patients' mean self-reported sleep quality was poor. Interrater reliability of sleep staging was highest for slow wave sleep and lowest for stage 1 sleep. CONCLUSIONS: The quantity and quality of sleep in intensive care patients are poor and may be related to noise, critical illness itself and treatment events that disturb sleep. The study highlights the challenge of quantifying sleep in the critical care setting and the need for alternative methods of measuring sleep. The results suggest that a sound reduction program is required and other interventions to improve clinical practices to promote sleep in intensive care patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand clinical trial registry (http://www.anzctr.org.au/): ACTRN12610000688088.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 55 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 179 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 17%
Student > Bachelor 24 13%
Other 16 9%
Researcher 16 9%
Student > Postgraduate 15 8%
Other 42 23%
Unknown 39 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 72 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 48 26%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Engineering 4 2%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Other 11 6%
Unknown 42 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 33. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2018.
All research outputs
#838,645
of 19,372,190 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#721
of 5,580 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,902
of 167,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#5
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,372,190 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,580 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 167,886 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.